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Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Upcycled Coin Pouch - Huipil Patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Trama Textiles - Upcycled coin pouch - Huipil patchwork
Upcycled Coin Pouch - Huipil Patchwork
Upcycled Coin Pouch - Huipil Patchwork

Upcycled Coin Pouch - Huipil Patchwork

$35.00

The huipil is the upper part of Mayan women's dresses and, historically, had the purpose of highlighting the marital and social status, age and power of the wearer while showcasing the high ability and refined skill of its weaver.


Today, the huipil is a symbol of cultural resistance and resilience against the standardisation brought about by unsustainable trends like fast fashion and unconscious consumerism.
Our weavers proudly defend and pass on their inestimable Mayan heritage by keeping alive the noble art of backstrap loom weaving, which dates back to the ancient times in which the human and divine worlds used to overlap and learn from each other.


It was Ix Chel, the goddess of childbirth, water and the moon, who taught the women of all Mayan communities how to tell stories without using their voices, but through wondrous textures and textiles that speak the language of beauty and marvel.


These precious pouches carry on the gift of Ix Chel and the tradition of huipil making, being made 100% from recycled parts of traditional Guatemalan dresses. Their precious designs and bright colors will be the perfect companions for your daily routines and adventurous travels. 


Enjoy discovering all the small details that make huipiles so breath-taking: each shape and pattern hides a special and ancestral meaning!

 

What do you need to know?

Material: 100% Rio Blanco Cotton; polyester lining.
Size: 5.9’’ x 4.3’’ – 15cm x 11cm.
Care: Hand-wash in cold water, treat stains with mild detergent, lay flat to air dry.
 

WE ARE UNIQUE

Each shopping bag is handmade by TRAMA's weavers using the traditional backstrap loom weaving technique of the Guatemalan highlands. Each product is the result of these women's craftsmanship, so they are not only beautiful but also incredibly durable and resistant.


WE ARE SUSTAINABLE FOR PEOPLE AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Our eco-friendly bags are made with 100% organic cotton and passion.

The whole process of production is energy- and resource-saving, with minimum usage of water and electricity.

TRAMA's cooperative guarantees fair wages to its weavers and funds education programmes for the young members of several Guatemalan communities.

By purchasing TRAMA's products, you are contributing to:

  • preserving our weavers' craftsmanship and cultural identity.
  • developing businesses founded on fair wages for workers and respect for the environment.

 

WHAT'S MORE?

If your thirst for knowledge is unquenchable, feel free to email us all your doubts and questions. We will be happy to share with you all our secrets!

Write to: coordinator@tramatextiles.org.


You can also check out our article about the meaning of some of the most frequent shapes and patterns that adorn traditional huipiles!

Here are a couple of examples:

Did you see a zig-zag pattern? Well, it might be a graphic representation of the mountains and volcanoes of Guatemala... or the symbol of the snake messengers of the mighty Sun god.

And the diamond-like shapes? They are usually references to the epic journey of the sun around the Earth, a metaphor of the never-ending dance of the cosmos.

What about the arrows? They imitate the rhythmic and agile movements of birds in the skies. Physical prowess was indeed a blessing for Mayan hunters, who prayed to Yum Kaax for bird-like speed and precision.

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